Medical Malpractice and Legal Issues News

 
 
  • Trump Wants Opioid Manufacturers to Face a Federal Lawsuit President Trump directed Attorney General Jeff Sessions to file a federal lawsuit, separate from state lawsuits, against opioid manufacturers in an effort to help stem an epidemic of addiction in the United States.
  • China to Prosecute Suspects, Confiscate Illegal Income of Scandal-Hit Vaccine Maker Chinese authorities will prosecute all suspects in a safety scandal at vaccine maker Changsheng Biotechnology Co Ltd and confiscate its illegal earnings, state broadcaster CCTV reported on Thursday.
  • New York Sues OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma Over Opioids New York state on Tuesday said it has sued Purdue Pharma LP, accusing the OxyContin (oxycodone hydrochloride) maker of widespread fraud and deception in the marketing of opioid products, contributing to a nationwide epidemic that has killed thousands.
  • 'Lessons Must Be Learned': UK Societies on Bawa-Garba Ruling The UK Court of Appeal decision that will soon allow Dr Hadiza Bawa-Garba to return to work was met with relief by most medical societies there; the overwhelming sentiment was 'lessons must be learned.'
  • AIDS 2018Laws to Protect People From HIV Exposure Fall Short The prosecution of people with HIV who expose others to the virus should reflect actual risk, the world's leading HIV physicians and scientists argue after hearing about unfair criminal cases.
  • Pediatrician Charged With 29 More Counts of Child Sex Abuse Pennsylvania's Attorney General says the pattern of abuse by the Johnstown physician goes back to the '80s and includes boys and girls and his own family members.
  • New York City Agrees to Pay $20.8 Mln in Nurses Case -Justice Dept. New York City has agreed to pay $20.8 million to settle federal discrimination charges made by registered nurses and midwives who said their work was not recognized as "physically taxing," the Justice Department said on Wednesday.
  • Jury Orders J&J to Pay $550 Mln in Missouri Asbestos Cancer Case A Missouri jury on Thursday found Johnson & Johnson liable in a lawsuit filed by 22 women who alleged the company's talc-based products, including J&J Baby Powder, contain asbestos and caused them ovarian cancer, and ordered the company to pay $550 million in compensatory damages.
  • Woman Gets $8.74M in Irish Cervical Cancer Screening Scandal A woman in Ireland who is now terminally ill because of a missed diagnosis of cervical cancer has reached a highly publicized settlement of 7.5 million Euros ($8.74 million).
  • U.S. Jury Orders DaVita to Pay $383.5 Mln in Wrongful Death Lawsuits A federal jury in Colorado has awarded $383.5 million to the families of three patients who they said suffered cardiac arrests and died soon after receiving dialysis treatments at clinics run by DaVita Inc.
  • U.S. Top Court Blocks California Law on Anti-Abortion Centers The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday blocked a California law requiring clinics that counsel women against abortion to notify clients of the availability of abortions paid for by the state, finding that it violated the free speech rights of these Christian-based facilities.
  • Thirty-Three Pregnant Cambodian Women Discovered in Surrogacy Raid Thirty-three pregnant Cambodian women who were carrying babies on behalf of Chinese clients have been discovered during a raid on an illegal commercial surrogacy operation, police said on Saturday.
  • Malpractice Award Caps May Alter CAD Testing, Management Researchers found evidence of physicians altering evaluation and treatment practices after adoption of noneconomic damage caps in medical malpractice suits.
  • Former Puma Biotech Exec Gets U.S. Prison Term for Insider Trading A former Puma Biotechnology Inc executive was sentenced on Wednesday to 2-1/4 years in prison for trading on inside information ahead of announcements by the biopharmaceutical company about a breast cancer drug it was developing.
  • Informed Consent Ruling Could Burden Physicians, Experts Say Excess caution after a Pennsylvania decision about informed consent may unnecessarily burden physicians and sideline other qualified medical professionals, say lawyers who studied the case.
  • No More 'Internment Camps': Democrats Disrupt Congressional Hearing Decrying "internment camps," Democrats and their supporters disrupted a high-profile U.S. congressional hearing on Tuesday with a dramatic protest against the Trump administration's policy of detaining immigrant children separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border.
  • Honduras, El Salvador Decry U.S. Border Separations Impact on Kids Honduras called on Monday for the United States to stop separating immigrant children from their parents at the U.S. border, while El Salvador warned that the policy puts children's health at risk and could cause psychosocial scars.
  • Portugal's Parliament Legalizes Cannabis-based Medicines Portugal's parliament overwhelmingly approved a bill on Friday to legalize marijuana-based medicines, after rejecting earlier proposals to allow patients to grow the drug at home.
  • Malpractice Caps Influence CAD Testing and Interventions Physicians who face lower malpractice caps are willing to tolerate more clinical uncertainty with respect to coronary artery disease (CAD) testing and treatment, researchers have found.
  • Utah Sues Opioid Maker Purdue Pharma After Settlement Talks Stall Utah's attorney general on Thursday sued OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma LP to hold it responsible for its role in the opioid epidemic after he said talks to reach a settlement between various states and the drugmaker stopped being productive.
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