Residents Resource Center News and Perspectives Featured

 
 
  • Medscape Residents Lifestyle & Happiness Report 2018 More than 1900 residents from over 29 specialties reveal their biggest frustrations, and intriguing information about their social life, personal health, and wellness.
  • The Harvard Zoo Experiment: Animals Educating Future Doctors Students at Harvard Medical School have been doing rotations at the Franklin Park Zoo. What they learn goes far beyond comparative medicine and arguably changes their overall perceptions about health.
  • The Real Story of PTSD Dr Robert Berezin's own experience with a near accident offers a glimpse into the psychopathology of post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • Millennial Physicians: Debunking the Stereotype   Lazy and unfocused or tech-savvy and ambitious? Dr Patel explores and challenges some of the stereotypes associated with millennial physicians.
  • Biologic Agents Are Changing the Landscape of Severe Asthma A fourth biologic for severe eosinophilic asthma may soon be available. Who is a candidate for this therapy and what effects can you expect?
  • Pancreatic Cyst Fluid Analysis: Predictor of Malignancy? Dr Lowenfels comments on a study that examines whether four protein markers present in the pancreatic cyst fluid increased the predictive accuracy of detecting a high-risk IPMN.
  • Working Outside the Box: Alternative Careers for Doctors Amid an epidemic of burnout, Dr Andrew Wilner presents alternative careers for physicians.
  • Gender Differences Among General Surgery Residents What differences exist between male and female surgical residents in terms of work hours, burnout, and psychological well-being?
  • Saudi Trainee Doctors Set to Head Home From Canada in Diplomatic Row Saudi Arabia has told hundreds of trainee doctors to leave Canada with only weeks' notice in the midst of a diplomatic spat, a move that could disrupt Canadian hospitals and end a 40-year-old program to train specialists for the kingdom.
  • Can You Make 'Sense' of This ECG? An ECG is obtained on an older man with hypertension who has an irregular pulse. What's your diagnosis?
  • Once Its Greatest Foes, Doctors Are Embracing Single-Payer Young physicians are pushing the medical establishment to rethink its long-held opposition. The political fallout could be substantial.
  • A 64-year-old man is admitted with throat swelling, difficulty swallowing, and drooling. Are you able to make the correct diagnosis?
  • Microbiome Makeover: Out With the Bad, In With the Good? Studies presented at DDW 2018 addressed the role of the microbiome in the development and treatment of IBS as well as other gastrointestinal disorders.
  • When Do We Need RCTs, and When Can We Manage Without Them? A recent debate on Twitter over the use of inferior vena cava filters reinforces the value of conducting randomized controlled trials in medicine, argues Dr Vinay Prasad.
  • Patients Can Make You a Better Resident Incorporating patient feedback can be challenging for new doctors. Here are some strategies to consider and key principles to remember.
  • An estimated 200 million people worldwide have various thyroid-related diseases, with many unaware of their conditions. Test your knowledge of key thyroid conditions with this quick quiz.
  • Autopsy as a Source of Discovery in Cardiovascular Medicine This essay presents a brief historical survey of the autopsy as a source of discovery in cardiovascular medicine. What role might it play in the modern era of precision medicine?
  • Spironolactone Over Clonidine in Resistant HTN: Do You Agree? Dr Desai asks, would you consider spironolactone for treating patients with resistant hypertension?
  • Are you familiar with the specific recommendations for preventive cancer screening by type? Test your knowledge with this quick quiz.
  • Are you current on new important FDA drug announcements during the past year? Review 2018's information on FDA drug approvals and changes.
  • Drug-Induced Thyroid Storm in Hashimoto's Disease Were the immune checkpoint inhibitors used to treat his melanoma responsible for development of thyroid storm in this patient with concurrent Hashimoto's disease and diabetes?
  • In a Haze About e-Cigarettes? 5 Things to Know They may help adults quit tobacco, but the adolescents using these products in ever-increasing numbers are a public health crisis in the making.
  • A 5-year-old child is presented for an ear infection. He was previously treated for recurrent bacterial pneumonia and twice required inpatient hospitalization. What underlying condition is at work?
  • Surgical-Resident Operative Experience Continues to Narrow Surgical-resident operative experience has narrowed over the past three decades, according to an analysis of national case logs.
  • Match These Quotes to Famous Medical Books Can you identify these famous quotes from some of medicine's most cherished tomes? Take the quiz to find out.
  • The Woman With Multiple Sclerosis and Blurry Vision Why is this 65-year-old patient with relapsing-remitting MS having decreased vision in her right eye?
  • Theranos Lied, but These Blood Assays Are Revolutionary If the deception of Theranos has you disappointed with biotechnological advancements, here are 10 blood test startups to restore your faith in medical innovation.
  • Want Med Students to Be Better Doctors? Make Them Teach Allowing students to teach helps them hone their skills in a unique way. Read how one student's experience teaching sexual education to middle-school students helped her gain 'knowledgeable empathy.'
  • Alert No Cure for Mistreated Trainees Awareness programs reflect the increasing focus on harassment in the workplace, but a new study finds that little high-quality research is available on how to solve the problem for medical trainees.
  • Real-World Data Meet AI: Will This Combo Improve Practice?   Can real-world data better inform the evidence base?
  • Heart Failure Guidelines: Introduction to the New Agents Review updated guidelines for the management of heart failure that have been revised to include the two novel pharmacologic agents sacubitril/valsartan and ivabradine.
  • The Unique Feature of the Israeli Type 2 Diabetes Guideline   The Israeli guidelines vary management of type 2 diabetes mellitus by BMI. Is that a strategy the rest of the world should consider?
  • 'Take a Patient Home': It's Eye-Opening   A pediatric endocrinologist describes how a home visit from a child with diabetes changed his perspective of what living with the disease is really like.
  • Cutting-Edge Primary Care Data From DDW 2018   Dr David Johnson shares new results impacting colon cancer screening, diabetes, anti-TNF agents, and other key areas.
  • Four New Studies in Neurology   Dr Diener reviews four studies likely to change the practice of neurology that encompass PFO closure in cryptogenic stroke, new treatments for migraine and glioblastoma, and tried-and-true treatments for MS.
  • Making Diabetes Guidance 'As Simple as Possible'   The Diabetes Canada Clinical Practice Guidelines were designed with practitioner and patient in mind.
  • The Dangers of a Medical Board Investigation: Watch Out Medical board investigations often--justifiably--strike fear into the hearts of physicians. Here's how to navigate this event if it happens to you.
  • Rare and Unusual Psychiatric Syndromes: A Primer There are several psychiatric illnesses that, although rarely seen in clinical practice, should be identifiable by physicians. Here are just a few.
  • Did Marijuana Save Kevin Smith's Life? After his MI, the self-anointed comic-book man claims he was told that smoking marijuana didn't cause the heart attack and may even have saved his life. Cardiologist Christopher Labos investigates.
  • Chronic Urticaria: Following Practice Guidelines This article summarizes proposed updated guidelines for the management of chronic urticaria, incorporating new information regarding biologics and 2nd generation antihistamines.
  • Caring for Older Surgical Patients Find out what there is to know regarding the needs of older patients undergoing surgery.
  • Systemic Changes May Reduce Gender Disparities in Medical Training Gender disparities in medical careers - in position, pay and publishing - start early, but even small systemic changes in training programs could begin to narrow these gaps, says a group of Harvard Medical School doctors.
  • The Most Perfect Medical Device of 2018   The best medical device of the year may already be in most of our homes.
  • AAN 2018A Computer Algorithm That Guides Stroke Care   Dr Mark Alberts discusses the benefits of using a CT profusion computer algorithm to identify patients with ischemic stroke who are candidates for thrombectomy.
  • More Nurse Practitioners Pursue Residency Programs to Hone Skills Proponents say the residencies provide help dealing with increasingly difficult cases, but some nursing groups contend that the programs are not necessary.
  • 5 Things to Know About CRISPR How many patients has it cured? What is CAS9? Get the story straight with this quick review.
  • Myasthenia gravis is a relatively rare autoimmune disorder that can result in weakness that leads to neuromuscular respiratory failure. Test yourself on key aspects with our short quiz.
  • Family Medicine and Obstetrics: Let's Stop Pretending Is delivering babies still one of the core activities of family medicine--and should it be? This editorial comments on the changing role of family physicians in providing maternity care.
  • Medscape Residents Salary & Debt Report 2018 More than 1900 residents from over 29 specialties reveal their salary; debts; relationships with attendings, nurses, and PAs; and other intriguing information.
  • The Top Comments on Medscape Psychiatry See our top picks for the best comments on Medscape Psychiatry in June 2018.
  • 'Gaming Disorder' Is Now Official   In the latest iteration of ICD, gaming disorder falls under the umbrella of addiction.
  • Are TV Docs Bad for Our Image? Readers debate the pros and cons of TV medical dramas.
  • A 64-year-old woman presents because of shortness of breath while at rest, nonproductive cough, and lower extremity swelling. Can you determine the unusual cause of her symptoms?
  • 'Really Good' New Guidelines for T2 Diabetes   Dr Anne Peters applauds the latest changes to guidelines that put cardiovascular risk at the forefront of type 2 diabetes management.
  • Sexual Harassment by Patients: How Doctors Handle It Physicians report that many patients make sexual advances. Some are easy to manage effectively; others, not so much. Here's what to do in that situation.
  • Guideline vs Physician: Which Do You Trust?   Guidelines were meant to make treatment decisions easier and more evidence-based, but it hasn't quite worked out that way, says Dr Lundberg.
  • Case Challenge: A Spreading Summertime Rash A man presents in July with scattered erythematous rashes. What is the cause, and what is the appropriate clinical approach?
  • Are you familiar with key similarities and differences between irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease? Refresh and test your knowledge with this quick quiz.
  • From Nearly Dead to Medical School Graduate Alex Lake was robbed and beaten, and nearly died. He was told to reconsider medical school but chose not to listen. This is his incredible story.
  • In the U.S. 'Healthcare' Is Now Strictly a Business Term In the United States, the business of healthcare and the practice of medicine are conflicting priorities. What can be done to shift the focus?
  • To Enrich Family Medicine Pool, Tap Community College Students Medical school graduates who had been to community college were more likely to choose family medicine than graduates who had not, a study found.
  • Stay current on new important guidelines and recommendations.
  • Stay current on new important guidelines and recommendations.
  • Stay current on new important guidelines and recommendations.
  • Stay current on new important guidelines and recommendations.
  • Stay current on new important guidelines and recommendations.
  • Stay current on new important guidelines and recommendations.
  • Stay current on new important guidelines and recommendations.
  • Ranging from benign to potentially quite serious, summer skin conditions are frequent causes of concern for patients. Test your knowledge of some notable seasonal problems with this quick quiz.
  • Are These Ocular Symptoms Common or Concerning? Can you correctly categorize these five common ocular symptoms and determine which might potentially indicate a worrisome pathology?
  • Analyze This Image: Make The Diagnosis in Vein   Can you tell who has the lowest left atrial pressure from the pulmonary vein Dopplers? Bonus for diagnosing all four patients.
  • Burnout and Scope of Practice in New Family Physicians Does the broad scope of care that family physicians provide contribute to their higher rate of burnout compared to other specialties?
  • Stay current on new important guidelines and recommendations.
  • Stay current on new important guidelines and recommendations.
  • A 39-year-old woman presents with a rash, fever, and facial twitches with tongue extrusions. Are you able to make this challenging diagnosis?
  • When We Say 'Physician Burnout,' We Really Mean Depression Prof Irvin Sam Schonfeld makes the case for not viewing these as separate conditions.
  • How to Mentor Millennials in Medicine A recent op-ed in JAMA explored pitfalls and potential models for mentoring millennials during medical training. Just how realistic and meaningful are those suggestions?
  • Advice for Female Physicians to Negotiate Higher Salaries More female physicians are entering medicine, but they are still earning less than their male peers. Many experts say women simply don't negotiate as often or as aggressively as male doctors.
  • Most Clinicians Know a Doctor Who Has Tried or Completed Suicide A Medscape poll finds that physicians, nurses, and medical students say depression, burnout, and stress are likely the three main contributors driving physician suicide.
  • Life and Times of Leading Cardiologists: Noel Bairey Merz   A top swimmer, Dr Bairey Merz received the first female athletic scholarship in the country. She relays her journey filled with 'firsts,' a brush with star power, and a passion for women's health.
  • New AMA Policy Calls for Physician Training on Suicide The American Medical Association encourages physician training on suicide risk assessment and prevention and how to counsel patients on gun safety.
  • Most Surgical Residents Who Work Extended Hours Are Volunteering, Not Being Coerced Most surgical residents who work longer hours than their shifts require do so voluntarily so they can learn and give their patients continuity of care, a new survey from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago suggests.
  • 5 Types of Diabetes: Can New Analysis Make Care Easier?   A new classification system may enable more personalized management approaches and improve outcomes.
  • White Privilege in a White Coat: Racism Shaped My Education In this essay, the author reflects on some of the ways racial privilege influenced his experience as a white physician in training.
  • Clinical Ultrasound for Acute Appendicitis Can emergency physicians safely and accurately diagnose acute appendicitis utilizing clinical ultrasound?
  • Malpractice Case: Physicians Should Be Able to Say 'I'm Sorry' Sometimes saying 'I'm sorry' to a patient or their family can help prevent a malpractice lawsuit. This case explains why an act of contrition has tremendous value.
  • Congestive Heart Failure After Atrial Fibrillation Ablation How would you manage CHF in this patient now 14 months after AF ablation? Take this quiz created by physicians from ACC.
  • Major Dyslipidemia Guidelines and Their Discrepancies Many differences exist between the five major dyslipidemia guidelines. What does this mean for clinicians? Experts from ACC weigh in.
  • Nailing Nail Pathology: Primary Care Case Challenge Can you 'nail' the diagnosis of these nail disorders?
  • Hospitalist? What's That?   How can hospitalists differentiate themselves from other general medicine providers? Is the Focused Practice in Hospital Medicine certification the solution?
  • The parents of a 5-month-old boy rush him to the emergency department because of severe abdominal distention. Can you make the diagnosis?
  • From Medical School Classrooms to the NFL Playing Field In May, Laurent Duvernay-Tardif became the first active NFL player to hold an MD. On the field and in medical school, the key to his success is balance.
  • 10% of Clinicians Sexually Harassed in Last 3 Years: Survey Among physicians, 7% said they were harassed. Twelve percent of residents reported they were harassed by more than seven people.
  • Cost Effectiveness of Anesthesia Providers How cost effective are various anesthesia delivery model types? Could expanding the role of CRNAs help reduce costs?
  • Specialists vs Primary Care: Whose Guidelines Matter? It may not exactly be a schism, but primary and specialty care are increasingly at odds over which field of practice's guidelines are best for patients.
  • How Academia Left Me Dr Nassir Ghaemi on his decision to partially step away from the academic life to accept an industry position.
  • A Psychiatrist's Elegy for Anthony Bourdain Dr Robert Berezin on the loss of a cultural icon and the speculation it produces.
  • Young Surgeons Face High Debt, Financial Instability As the costs of medical school and training continue to rise, young surgeons often face debt burdens that make it difficult for them to start their careers and pay off their loans, according to a new study.
  • CDC Warns Residents in 8 U.S. States of Cut-fruit Salmonella Outbreak The head of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Sunday urged residents of eight U.S. states to check for recalled pre-cut melon that is linked to an outbreak of Salmonella.
  • Cholelithiasis (gallstone disease) may result in significant pain. Do you know key aspects involving the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment? Test your knowledge by taking this short quiz.
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