Residents Resource Center News and Perspectives Featured

 
 
  • 'Leading the Charge' on Racism, Sexism, Activism in Medicine   Emergency medicine doctor and 'public health guru' Esther Choo on racism, sexism, inequity, and inclusion in medicine.
  • New Data on Treating Depression in Dementia   Do clinical trials support the efficacy of antidepressants in patients with dementia and depression? Dr Yellowlees reports on a new Cochrane Review.
  • Cardiology Topics to Watch for in 2019 Wearables, aspirin for secondary prevention, AI and machine learning, and drug pricing are among the topics to keep an eye on in 2019, according to cardiologists Drs Harrington and Gibson.
  • Risk Factors for Prolonged Opioid Use After Spine Surgery Which spine surgery patients are more at risk of prolonged opioid usage after surgery?
  • Joint pain results in substantial financial costs and diminished quality of life. Do you know key aspects and guidelines for best practices related to common causes of joint pain?
  • An 80-year-old woman presents with malaise, nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, and watery diarrhea. She is highly active, with a full-time job as a realtor. What's the diagnosis?
  • Leadership in American Surgery: Women Are Rising to the Top Women are increasingly playing leadership roles in the surgical field, but it is equally important to continue to advance diversity in these positions.
  • Confronting the Tension Between Academic and Community Oncologists Ravi Parikh addresses the differences between academic and community oncologists, and how they can not only collaborate but also capitalize on each other's unique resources.
  • Analysis of the Popular Social Media for Plastic Surgeons When it comes to effectively utilizing social media platforms, what do plastic surgeons need to know?
  • Clinical Informatics: Is It the Right Field for You? Clinical informatics is a relatively new subspecialty that focuses on using data to improve patient care. Here's how to tell whether this field may be right for you.
  • Shoulder and Knee MRI for the Sports Medicine Physician This article describes a systematic approach to evaluating both shoulder and knee MRIs for sports medicine clinicians.
  • Long-acting Reversible Contraception Provision by FPs Although the percentage of family physicians providing LARC services continues to rise, it still remains low. What can be done to help FPs integrate these services into primary care?
  • Are you familiar with key aspects of Bell palsy, including best practices for diagnosis and treatment? Refresh and test your knowledge with this short quiz.
  • DO Match Day Yields More Than 500 Primary Care Residents Primary care specialties make up 56% of matches, with orthopedic surgery tops in specialty placements.
  • Workplace Bullying Among Surgeons Bullying behavior at the surgical workplace is an important issue that can have damaging effects. Is there a solution?
  • 2019 guidelines on metastatic colorectal cancer by the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.
  • Ethical Issues in Aesthetic and Reconstructive Innovation Innovations play an important role in advancing the field of plastic surgery, but there are various ethical issues to consider.
  • Malpractice Case: One Way to Defend a Missed Diagnosis A 'causation defense' can protect against a ruling of medical negligence, but only under certain circumstances.
  • A 66-year-old man was admitted after sustaining numerous injuries from a fall. On the second day, the patient believed he heard the voice of his deceased spouse. What's the diagnosis?
  • USMLE-Rx: Best Practices for Students   Our medical student representative, Neil Bhavsar, speaks with Tao Le, MD, creator of USMLE-Rx about ways to maximize the study tool and approaches students may not have realized they should be taking.
  • Future Directions for Practice-Based Research Networks What areas should practice-based research networks be concentrating on moving forward? This report details the recommendations of current family medicine/primary care PBRN directors.
  • Poverty and Cancer Disparities in Ohio How do cancer rates, risk factors, and outcomes differ between the poorest and the most affluent counties in Ohio?
  • From supplementation use to conditions associated with deficiencies, are you familiar with key aspects and best practices associated with vitamins? Test your knowledge with this short quiz.
  • 2018 expert consensus decision pathways by the American College of Cardiology for novel therapies for cardiovascular risk reduction in individuals with type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
  • 2019 guidelines from the American Academy of Dermatology on the evaluation and management of primary cutaneous melanoma.
  • 2019 guidelines on computed tomography in transcatheter aortic valve implantation by the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT).
  • Cyberattacks in Medicine: Is Radiology the Weakest Link? A fake cancer diagnosis of a prominent figure, a lethal radiation dose — just two examples of the havoc that hackers could wreak in our increasingly networked and digitized health information systems.
  • #MeToo Era Presents Complex Questions for Oncology   Drs Kathy Miller and Reshma Jagsi discuss research findings and important issues related to sexual harassment and discrimination.
  • Should All Medical Schools Have Free Tuition?   Art Caplan discusses potential positives and pitfalls of tuition-free medical school with Robert Grossman, dean of NYU Langone Medical School, and Tim Rice, deputy director at the Manhattan Institute.
  • The Mysteries of Menopause and Urogynecologic Health This article explores the relationship of menopausal estrogen levels to the epidemiology and pathogenesis of common pelvic floor disorders and genitourinary syndromes of menopause.
  • Step Inside the Patient Safety Horror Room The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine uses a 'Patient Safety Room of Horrors' to train about common errors and dangers. Can you recognize what's wrong in these pictures?
  • An Evolutionary Concept Analysis of Urinary Incontinence In this article, the development and utilization of a urinary incontinence concept analysis is described.
  • Another ICU Intervention That May Not Work as Advertised Dr Aaron Holley on the continued debate over whether PPIs truly limit GI bleeding in this setting.
  • Human Rabies--Virginia, 2017 This fatal case of rabies after a dog bite sustained on a trip to India underscores the importance of obtaining a thorough pretravel health consultation and accurate, timely postexposure diagnosis.
  • Differential Diagnosis of Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency Was this obese 12-year-old boy's abnormal lipid profile and elevated liver enzymes due to NAFLD or something more unusual?
  • Macrophage Activation Syndrome in Adults This article offers an update on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of macrophage activation syndrome associated with rheumatic disease.
  • Medication Ordering Errors Made by Residents in the EMR Era Has greater use of the EMR help reduce medication errors made by IM residents? This study aimed to better understand trends in trainees' medication order errors at a large academic medical center.
  • U.S. Army Vows to Fix 'Broken' Housing at Fort Meade in Wake of Reuters Report The commander of one of the largest Army bases in the United States promised residents to fix a "broken" housing system in which maintenance lapses by a private landlord left military families in homes with health and safety hazards.
  • Virtual Reality: A New Reality for Orthopedic Surgery   The Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America has developed a virtual reality training module with the potential to dramatically change the way that surgeons learn.
  • How Hospitalists Can Improve Shift-to-Shift Patient Handoffs Improving handoff communication and procedures results in dramatic decreases in medical errors. Presented are five strategies to build better patient handoffs.
  • Malpractice Case: The Danger of Not Referring to a Specialist Although primary care physicians are handling more of their patients' ailments, they should always seek specialty guidance when needed.
  • Med-Student Documentation Guidelines Need Careful Implementation New student-documentation guidelines from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) require careful implementation to avoid reductions in meaningful teaching physician involvement, according to a new report.
  • Students Urge Step 1 Fixes, Physician Leaders Reply With Insult The response seems to indicate a generational divide in the medical community.
  • Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery: One Innovator's Journey Discussing the advances, personal and technological, that led to a career at the forefront of less invasive spine surgery.
  • 'Hope' and 'Optimism' for Reducing Physician Burnout   It's not all dire. Tait Shanafelt, MD, is witnessing improvement and momentum in the field of clinician wellness. Learn about his journey from hematology to chief wellness officer.
  • Buprenorphine Prescribing Restrictions in the Opioid Epidemic Dr Hanson makes a strong argument for why buprenorphine should be considered in the ED after an opioid-related overdose or withdrawal.
  • New Commission Report Is Tough on MOC The commission formed by the American Board of Medical Specialties urged a switch from high-stakes summative exams to yearly, formative assessments.
  • More Nurse Practitioners Providing Primary Care Where MDs in Short Supply A growing number of nurse practitioners are providing primary care in rural and low-income U.S. communities where the physician workforce is shrinking, a new study suggests.
  • International Medical Graduates in Plastic Surgery Residency A survey of international medical graduates provides insight into the characteristics of those who successfully matched into US-based plastic surgery residency programs.
  • MOC Alternative Showing Success A 30-question assessment taken online quarterly gives immediate feedback, asks physicians to rate their confidence on each answer, and links questions with CME.
  • How Can Medical Trainees Combat Sexual Harassment?   Sexual harassment in the medical profession: Dr Nicole Saphier discusses several areas of this important topic with Drs Janine Knudsen and Rosalyn Plotzker.
  • Roz on Residency: The Advice Column You've Been Looking For In her debut advice column, Roz gets honest about burnout and provides some personal suggestions for trainees who may be struggling.
  • Cancer Mortality Continues to Spiral Downward in the US National snapshot of cancer in the US shows a continued decline in mortality rates for the most common cancers in men and women with a few notable exceptions.
  • After Bitter Closure, Rural Texas Hospital Reopens The 25-bed hospital in Crockett, Texas, abruptly closed its doors in 2017, but the community kept the faith and several doctors reopened the facility this year.
  • Diagnosing Acute Compartment Syndrome When it comes to diagnosing acute compartment syndrome, relying on the guidelines published in medical textbooks may be misguided.
  • Enough Talk: Preventing Burnout During Medical Training We are approaching a burnout in discussing burnout. Instead, here's a look at what the medical education community is actively doing to turn the tide against this crisis.
  • Surgical Glove Perforations: A Surprising Number Go Unnoticed   A new study finds that gloves used during orthopedic surgery perforate easily and unsuspectingly. Study author Dr Todd Lawrence discusses these findings and how to minimize risky practices.
  • Errors in Diagnosing Optic Neuritis--How Can We Fix Them? A new study sheds light on the alarmingly high rate of misdiagnosis--and misallocated treatments--in this acute condition.
  • Is Confidence Overrated in Medical Practice?   Eric Topol talks with med student Nicole Treadway about her intriguing essay, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, on confidence and paternalism in medicine.
  • Refresh your knowledge with a quick look at techniques for reduction of shoulder dislocation in the emergency department or office, including videos. Can you answer the assessment question correctly?
  • An Overview of Zoonotic Helminth Infections in North America Review diagnosis and characteristics of the 30 most common zoonotic helminth infections that might be encountered in clinical practice in North America.
  • Time to Abandon Antimicrobial Approaches in Wound Healing Antimicrobials are commonly used in wound care, but it may be time to rethink that approach.
  • Smartphone Post-op Photos: Proceed With Caution Dr Lowenfels comments on a study that evaluated whether patient-generated photographs improve a surgeon's ability to remotely determine the likelihood of a wound complication.
  • Physician, 57, Killed by Falling Ice While Hiking Judith Pinsker was a primary care physician at Tufts Medical Center for more than 20 years. She spoke fluent Spanish, played the flute, and loved the outdoors and helping with medical service trips.
  • AHA/ASA Deletes Sections From 2018 Stroke Guidelines Some sections of the latest stroke guidelines have been removed. Find out what there is to know.
  • Eric Topol's Top Advances in 2018 That Are Shaping Medicine Which advances in 2018 have the most potential to transform medicine? Dr Eric Topol shares his insights.
  • Swimming With Sharks: One Doctor's Passion Dr Bert Mandelbaum on his own experiences, and how best to manage these apex predators' (exceptionally rare) bites.
  • Expert-Recommended Resolutions for Medical Education in 2019 We asked our advisory board which resolutions they'd suggest for med students in the New Year, as well as which resolutions medical education as a whole should adopt.
  • How Can Spirituality Be Used in Clinical Practice?   Drs Drew Ramsey and Anna Yusim discuss professional and personal ways to address spirituality in medicine.
  • Should Patients Call You by Your First Name? In an age where everyone seems to lean toward being less formal, many physicians still don't feel comfortable with patients using their first name in medical settings. Your colleagues weigh in.
  • A 56-year-old woman has had worsening paresthesias in her arms for several months. She also has noticed that she coughs and chokes while she is eating and drinking. What's the diagnosis?
  • Kids With Altered Mental Status: No Diagnosis Is Pretty Common In a single visit, the ability to make a diagnosis, and the yield of diagnostic testing, are both regrettably low.
  • More Programs Offering Global-health Education for Pediatric Residents An increasing number of training programs are offering global-health education for pediatric residents, but gaps remain, researchers report.
  • Evolving Medical Education for a Digital Future As technology continues to advance in healthcare, what are the more recent implications for physicians?
  • 'Interesting Research' in Pediatric Cardiology: AHA 2018   Dr Andrew Glatz discusses important research on pediatric CPR and prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease presented at AHA 2018.
  • You Don't Need 800 Cable Channels (Or Tumor Genetic Mutations) Jack West discusses the limits of personalized medicine using next-generation sequencing, and in particular the difficulty of scaling up a truly 'personalized' approach.
  • Review of Biologics in Children With Severe Asthma Biologics are revolutionizing the management of moderate to severe asthma. A summary of currently approved biologics in addition to a few new medications that are still being evaluated.
  • The Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Cancer Incidence Dr Lowenfels comments on a study that reviews the risk for hormone-related, colorectal, and esophageal cancers following bariatric surgery.
  • Doctors: 4 Steps to Building Your Finances Don't let bad financial decisions hurt the start of a promising career. There are strategies to use early on to enjoy a paycheck but also avoid major debt.
  • ARBs/ACEIs After AKI: Balancing Tradeoffs Dr Bansal reviews a study that provides important data on the use of RAAS inhibitors after acute kidney injury--an understudied clinical topic.
  • Desperately Seeking More Primary Care Docs   The PCP shortage is a looming public health emergency, says Dr Patel.
  • 'Remarkably Distressing': 35% of US Population Obese   The state of obesity 2018: Dr Maurie Markman discusses sobering statistics demonstrating this serious public health problem in the United States.
  • The Year's Top 10 Gastroenterology Articles Dr David Johnson comments on the latest recommendations and clinical studies that are reshaping how we treat some of the most common gastrointestinal disorders.
  • How Healthcare Professionals Can Think Outside the Gift Box This holiday season, everyone who has chosen a career in medicine should try thinking beyond their immediate surroundings. Here's a tip for how to make the most of the season.
  • A Doctor's Rules for Other Doctors - Part 2   With more examples, part 2 of Dr Lundberg's holiday message underscores why this book would make an excellent gift for young and not-so-young clinicians.
  • Increasing Motivation for Alcohol Patients During Detox Could a brief psychoeducational group counseling session during alcohol detoxification treatment increase the motivation for and utilization of subsequent treatments?
  • The Top Cardiology Trials of 2018 in Review Contrasting studies on the benefits of percutaneous mitral valve repair and a fall from grace for aspirin make the list for Bob Harrington and Mike Gibson. Find out what else piqued their interest.
  • Avoiding Sexually Transmitted Infections: Beware Partner A   A new study examines the impact of 'serial monogamy' on the risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections, but it may miss the most important point, says Dr Perry Wilson.
  • Metformin and B12 Deficiency: A Bigger Problem Than We Thought   New evidence suggests that preventing vitamin B12 deficiency could reduce peripheral neuropathy in patients on metformin.
  • 40 Years of Medicine: Reflections of an Endocrinologist Dr Richard Plotzker shares his thoughts on 40 years of medical practice as he enters retirement.
  • What It Takes to Be a Top 10 Stroke Hospital Dr Andrew Wilner on how physician surveys of top hospitals provide models of success worth emulating.
  • Latent TB: Updated Treatment Recommendations   CDC has updated guidance and resources for the treatment of latent TB infection--with important changes.
  • Gomco or Mogen for Newborn Circumcision: Is One Better? Which device is associated with more post-op complications?
  • Are Showerheads Causing Chronic Lung Infections?   An ecologic study reveals the US hotspots for showerhead biofilms contaminated with mycobacteria and a geographical correlation with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease.
  • A 42-year-old woman with a chronic productive cough is repeatedly treated for pneumonia. At her latest follow-up, she reports intermittent dyspnea and fatigue. What's the diagnosis?
  • A Doctor's Rules for Other Doctors--Part 1   A new book, written by an experienced physicians to all physicians, especially younger colleagues, makes a great holiday gift suggestion.
  • Do Neprilysin Inhibitors Have a Role in Patients With CKD? Dr Desai reviews the UK HARP-III trial, which compares the effects of sacubitril/valsartan and irbesartan on kidney function in people with CKD.
  • Urgent Surgical Procedures: Does It Matter Who Is On Call? Dr Lowenfels comments on a study that examined whether surgical experience contributed to the outcomes of patients requiring urgent procedures.
  • Venous thromboembolism encompasses deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Are you familiar with best practices for diagnosis and treatment? Refresh and test your knowledge with this short quiz.
  • Cardiovascular Outcomes Trials Give 'Comforting' Results   Dr Anne Peters gives us her take on the recent CARMELINA, DECLARE-TIMI, and REWIND trials and their cardiovascular outcomes.
https://pillsbank.net

top-obzor.com

https://pillsbank.net