Residents Resource Center News and Perspectives Featured

 
 
  • Houston Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection Testing This paper presents guidelines for implementing testing for H. pylori infection in U.S. health care systems, with a focus on identifying target populations for diagnosis and therapy.
  • 'Narrative Medicine' May Help Stem Physician Burnout As reports of rising levels of physician burnout and suicide accumulate, two pediatricians urge medical programs to consider using "narrative medicine" to help humanize practice and begin to treat the heavy emotional toll many doctors experience.
  • Molecular Link Discovered Between Aging and ALS, Dementia   Dr Alan Jacobs on a recent study that opens up new targets for treating neurodegenerative diseases.
  • SGLT2 Inhibitors: Is This the Start of a New Era? Gregory Nichols discusses exciting new clinical trial results demonstrating the benefits of SGLT2 inhibitors, as presented at the AHA 2018 Scientific Sessions.
  • Exclusive Residency Insights From the Head of the NRMP We spoke with Mona M. Signer, president and CEO of the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP), about advice for students on the path to residency and some concerning issues involving The Match.
  • Open-Label Placebos: Why Are They Effective? We don't know why they work for some patients, or whether their effects can be sustained.
  • Time Out of Mind: How Disrupted Sleep Hurts Brain Health Circadian rhythm researchers are uncovering crucial links between our internal clock and neurodegenerative and psychological disorders.
  • Analyze This Image: Remote History of Mitral Valve Replacement   Mechanical valves can pose problems on imaging, but Ronald Wharton, MD, shows you how to see through the shadows.
  • Care for organ donors and transplant recipients extends beyond surgical teams. Are you able to correctly answer all five of these donation- and transplantation-related questions?
  • ECG Challenge: Tired and Out of Control An older woman presents with hypertension and lightheadedness. What does her ECG show?
  • Kugelberg Welander spinal muscular atrophy is a rare, inherited, pediatric lower motor neuron disorder. How much do you know about Kugelberg Welander SMA? Test your knowledge with our short quiz.
  • Food and Fertility: What to Consume When Trying to Conceive Although we have only observational evidence, certain nutrients seem to enhance--and others to harm--efforts to conceive.
  • Multiple sclerosis treatment aims to reduce relapses, lesions seen on MRI, symptoms, and progression of disability. Are you familiar with current strategies? Test yourself with this quick quiz.
  • FP Workforce: Progress in Racial and Ethnic Diversity This brief highlights continuing disparities in demographic composition of the FP workforce in the US, suggesting that efforts to increase diversity have been effective for some groups, but not all.
  • 2018 guidelines by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine for imaging in neuroblastoma.
  • 2018 guidelines on pediatric care in the emergency department by the AAP, ACEP, and ENA.
  • 2018 guidelines by the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, and the Heart Rhythm Society on the evaluation and management of bradycardia and cardiac conduction delay.
  • 2018 guidelines by the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, and multisocieties on the management of blood cholesterol.
  • A 24-year-old woman presents with gradually worsening anxiety and depression over the past 2 months, despite ongoing treatment. Can you make the diagnosis?
  • Finding Your Second Career: Stories From Oncologists Most physicians wrongly think that there are few opportunities for second careers, but in reality there are many -- and oncologists are in high demand.
  • Vaping Pot More Powerful Than Smoking It   People who haven't tried cannabis in a long time should beware that with new vaping devices, they may get higher than intended, according to a small study.
  • Inappropriate Questions Common During Orthopedic-Surgery-Residency Interviews Women applying for orthopedic-surgery-residency programs today are just as likely to be asked inappropriate questions as they were four decades ago, new findings show.
  • 2018 guidelines on physical activity by the Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee of the US Department of Health and Human Services.
  • Early diagnosis and treatment of VTE significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. Are you familiar with the presentation and treatment of venous thromboembolism? Test yourself with this short quiz.
  • Viral Hepatitis: Five Highlights From the Liver Meeting Dr William Balistreri reports on the most important viral hepatitis news from this year's Liver Meeting.
  • 5 Things to Know About Bladder Cancer From new immunotherapies to the role of the microbiome in cancer pathogenesis, here are the most important recent developments in bladder cancer.
  • Are Residency Application Photos Used for Discrimination? A recent publication argued that headshots should not be submitted with residency applications because of discrimination. We spoke with one of the authors to see what students and faculty should know.
  • When the Government Promotes Marijuana Use Should the government encourage the use of marijuana for patients with pain disorders?
  • Why Do We Love Sad Music? Mourning Our Pain Dr Robert Berezin explores the psychology of why we gravitate toward sad music during trying times.
  • Rituximab for Nephrotic Syndrome in Kids: A Note of Caution Dr William Basco hesitates to recommend an immediate switch to rituximab as a steroid-sparing agent in children with nephrotic syndrome.
  • Drug-Induced Uveitis Which medications may be associated with the development of uveitis?
  • 'My Generation's Biggest Alzheimer's Advocate': Seth Rogen   Actor Seth Rogen, a prominent advocate and fundraiser for Alzheimer research, lets Dr Isaacson and all doctors know why the time is now to be discussing Alzheimer prevention with their patients.
  • Former Candidate for Governor Settles Wrongful Death Suit; More Emergency custody orders trigger a horrific tragedy; untreated polyp leads to patient's death and a lawsuit; high court weighs survivor damages for deceased plaintiff.
  • Simple Estimates for Local Prevalence of Latent TB Infection This report describes a simple method for estimating latent tuberculosis infection prevalence using genotyping results.
  • Chronic Pruritus: Neurophysiology and Neuromodulatory Therapy Learn about recent progress in our understanding of the molecular and neurophysiological mechanisms governing pruritus. How might immunomodulatory drugs be used to treat this debilitating condition?
  • C. auris in Healthcare Facilities, New York, USA, 2013-2017 An investigation into an outbreak of healthcare-associated C. auris infections provides insight into the colonization, transmission, and prevention of these infections.
  • Although most causes of syncope are benign, this symptom presages a life-threatening event in some patients. Are you familiar with key aspects? Refresh and test your knowledge with this short quiz.
  • Why You Need (and Should Be) a Mentor Although it can be intimidating to find or serve as a mentor, this relationship can make or break your career in medicine.
  • The Most Common Mistakes to Avoid During Residency Certain mistakes in residency are common to all specialties. Luckily, most are avoidable. Here are a few important ones to keep in mind.
  • Leaving Practice to Manage a Hospital: One Doctor's Story Dr Andrew Wilner speaks with Dr Lily Henson about the challenges and benefits of shifting into hospital administration.
  • The New Seizure Terminology No more 'grand mal' or even 'partial complex seizures.' Find out which terms are outdated and which are newer and more accurate.
  • On the Gender Gap in Radiology Why is radiology failing to attract more women? This editorial explores how diversity might be improved in the radiology specialty.
  • Migraine in America Symptoms and Treatment (MAST) Study This article summarizes both the design and the findings of the MAST study, an epidemiologic survey of people with migraine in the United States.
  • #ThisISOurLane: Doctor's Viral Tweet Puts Gun Controversy in Context   When the NRA told doctors to 'stay in their lane' and avoid talking about gun control, Dr Judy Melinek's Twitter response sparked national attention.
  • CV Risk Assessment: A Process, Not a Calculation   Tips on how to estimate, personalize, and reclassify patient risk in light of the new cholesterol guidelines. Dr Blaha walks through a typical patient case with guideline writer Dr Lloyd-Jones
  • Supraglottic Airway Device or Tracheal Intubation in OHCA? Is a supraglottic airway device superior to tracheal intubation as the initial advanced airway management strategy in adults with nontraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest?
  • Vitamin D Deficiency Elevates Colorectal Cancer Risk   Dr David Johnson on why we should consider vitamin D supplementation beyond its benefits for bone health.
  • Antibiotics for Everyone? Is it possible to keep patients happy while practicing antimicrobial stewardship?
  • Interruption of DOACs in Preprocedural and Acute Settings How long should direct thrombin inhibitors be held prior to invasive procedures?
  • For the Good of Your Patients, Use SGLT2 Inhibitors   Don't let mixed messages about SGLT2 inhibitors and reports of adverse effects deter you from prescribing these drugs, says Per-Henrik Groop.
  • Is Skipping Med School Lectures Making Inferior Doctors? An increasing number of medical students do not attend lectures in person. Is it possible that this new approach to learning may have alarming, often-overlooked consequences?
  • Surviving the Holidays With Diabetes Celebrating the holidays doesn't have to be a choice between losing glycemic control or missing out on the fun. Dr Akshay Jain provides some tips to help guide discussions on safe holiday eating.
  • AHA 2018Nothing Fishy: Triglyceride Lowering With High-Dose EPA   How do the findings from the REDUCE-IT trial square with prior data on triglycerides and CVD? Prof Armitage sees a pattern.
  • 'Sex Addiction' in 10% of US Men, 7% of Women?   Perry Wilson reviews a new JAMA study that found a surprisingly high rate of distress over compulsive sexual urges among US men and women, asking: Should they all be treated?
  • A 65-year-old woman underwent a routine outpatient screening colonoscopy. Twelve hours later, she developed dizziness, abdominal pain, and left-shoulder discomfort. What's the diagnosis?
  • Serious cases of food poisoning can result in permanent disability or death. Are you prepared to confront common causes of food poisoning? Refresh and test your knowledge with this short quiz.
  • The Relation Between Thyroid Function and Anemia Is there a greater risk for developing anemia among patients with thyroid disease?
  • Don't Be so Cavalier About That Non-Hip Fracture Are some fractures a reflection of underlying disease? Dr Plotzker says clinicians should be aware of the medical risks of more distal, non-hip fractures in older patients.
  • Are We Taught to Interpret and Weigh Test Results Incorrectly? Medical schools may not sufficiently teach students about probabilistic thinking, and this could have dangerous results.
  • How Our Genomes Shape Psychiatric Symptoms Dr Robert Berezin explores genetic contributions to mental illness and what he feels is a 'unified field theory ' in psychiatry.
  • Obscure Medical Terms: How Well Do You 'Speak Medicine'? How well do you identifying the most obscure of medical terminology? Test yourself on the meanings of these little-used terms.
  • An Ode to Canada and Cannabis   Canada's 2018 Cannabis Act makes perfectly good sense.
  • Initial ChEI Therapy Dose and Serious Events in Older Adults This study examined the relationship of initial dose and short-term serious events in older adults with dementia undergoing cholinesterase inhibitor therapy.
  • ESMO 2018: 'Tremendous Advances' in Breast Cancer Treatment   ESMO 2018 may have had 'some of the most exciting data we have seen in breast cancer in some time.' Drs Rugo, Cardoso, and Curigliano discuss Impassion130, SOLAR-1, and PALOMA-3.
  • Put the Focus on Dinner for Blood Sugar Control   What do you do for patients in whom multiple combinations of oral antihyperglycemics are failing to control blood sugar levels? Dr Cyrus Desouza says to focus on the largest meal of the day.
  • Hard Lessons From Year 1 of Oncology Fellowship Loss of autonomy. Practicing in areas of medicine without good evidence. Providing end-of-life care. Oncology fellowship comes with its own unique set of tough lessons.
  • A 49-year-old man with a medical history of alcohol abuse, tobacco dependence, and pancreatitis presents with abdominal pain that has lasted for 3 days. What's the diagnosis?
  • Peritonsillar abscess remains a common clinical entity in the emergency department and in an otolaryngology practice. Are you familiar with proper drainage procedures?
  • About 71 million people globally have chronic hepatitis C, with approximately 399,000 dying annually from this infection. Test yourself on both the basics and the latest information on this condition.
  • Updates in Sjögren Syndrome Dr Robert Fox discusses the latest diagnostic and therapeutic advances in this autoimmune disorder.
  • Are you prepared for another flu season? Test yourself on essential core components of influenza and refresh your knowledge of best practices with this quick quiz.
  • The Misunderstood Coagulopathy of Liver Disease An elevated INR is commonly considered an indication of bleeding risk in patients with liver disease, but is this practice supported by the evidence?
  • Daily Sleep Duration and Risk of Dementia and Mortality This study aimed to elucidate the association between daily sleep duration and risk of dementia and death in a community-dwelling elderly population. Does use of hypnotics influence the risk?
  • Meta-analyses: 5 Things to Know Meta-analyses are on the rise, but they are only as good as the techniques that produce them. These tips help determine whether you're dealing with 'garbage in, garbage out' or a worthwhile study.
  • 2018 guidelines by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) on the prevention of medication errors in hospitals.
  • Amyloidosis is characterized by the accumulation of fibrillar proteins in various body tissues. Test your knowledge of the classification, diagnosis, and treatment of amyloidosis with this short quiz.
  • 2018 guidelines on metastatic non-small cell lung cancer by the European Society for Medical Oncology.
  • 2018 guidelines on thoracolumbar burst fractures by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.
  • A Self-sustaining Neurosurgical Residency Program in Haiti Currently, Haiti has only 4 formally trained neurosurgeons for a population of 10.5 million. This article describes an initiative to create a neurosurgical training program to meet this urgent need.
  • 2018 updated guidelines by the Canadian Cardiovascular Harmonized National Guideline Endeavour (C-CHANGE) on the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease in primary care.
  • What Established Doctors Really Think About Younger Doctors Is there something different about the generation now graduating medical school? We talked to doctors from various specialties to see what they have to say about their younger peers.
  • AAO 2018Sexual Harassment Common in Ophthalmology, Survey Finds Anecdotal reports of sexual harassment at work and results from a survey on the issue in ophthalmology, completed primarily by women, reveal a challenging problem.
  • 2018 consensus guidelines by the ADA and EASD on the management of type 2 diabetes in adults.
  • Oral Antibiotics for Infective Endocarditis: Time to Switch?   The standard of care for endocarditis for many years has been IV antibiotics, even though many patients don't complete the full treatment. Would oral antibiotics work just as well?
  • AMA Will Award $15 Million in Grants to Reimagine Residency This 5-year second phase builds on revamping medical education. Up to eight projects will receive funding next year to help bridge the gap between current training and the evolving healthcare system.
  • A Paraplegic Doc's Inspiring Comeback After Spinal Injury   Dr Daniel Grossman describes his journey--as a patient and a physician--back to practice within 5 months of sustaining an extensive injury.
  • Echo Case: Four of a Kind Dr Wharton demonstrates an interesting and unusual case of a young adult with dyspnea, highlighting the value of M-mode echocardiography.
  • Is Insurer 'Scaring' Members Away From ED?   Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield is retroactively denying coverage for emergency department visits -- if they turn out to be nonemergent cases, reports Perry Wilson.
  • Lawsuit if You Don't Disclose Your Lack of Expertise? It's hard to become expert on a procedure if you don't keep getting experience, but must you tell your patient how many (or few) of the procedures you have done?
  • A Process for Identifying Individual Health Priorities How can clinicians more easily align care with patients' health priorities? This paper describes a clinically feasible process to help older adults identify priorities that can guide decision-making.
  • Death Certificates: Do We Always Know 'Cause of Death'? Getting cause of death right is important. But is it achievable?
  • Periodic Paralysis: Shedding Light on a Rare Neurologic Disorder This infrequent neuromuscular disorder is commonly mistaken for a multitude of other disorders, but diagnosis can be confirmed with key clues and genetic testing.
  • Can Tight Blood Pressure Control Prevent Dementia?   Dr Richard Isaacson discusses recent results from the SPRINT MIND study exploring the link between blood pressure and dementia risk.
  • Peritoneal Dialysis Offers Flexibility in Austere Environments Dr Desai highlights a number of unique aspects of peritoneal dialysis that make it attractive in difficult situations.
  • Improving Communication Between Surgery and Critical Care What strategies may help improve communication between teams during the postoperative surgical handover to the ICU?
  • Update on Giant Cell Arteritis Get up-to-date on the latest advances in diagnostic imaging modalities and treatment options for giant cell arteritis.
  • Various cardiology guidelines have been updated or released that contain important, potentially practice-changing information all doctors should know. Take this short quiz to test your knowledge.
  • Why Aren't We Prescribing Pills for Obesity? Dr Caroline Apovian says obesity is a chronic condition that may require pharmacotherapy or even bariatric surgery. So why aren't they included in the 2018 USPSTF recommendation statement?
  • The Love-Hate Relationship With Levothyroxine Levothyroxine, despite being the most prescribed drug in the United States, has many patients disenchanted and looking to T3 for symptom relief. How should clinicians approach the T4/T3 controversy?
  • Vulnerable Plaque: Are Targeted Therapies Within Reach? Recent studies aim to move vulnerable plaque identification into the cath lab routine. Can these tests pinpoint who will benefit most from aggressive pharmacologic therapies and maybe even stents?
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